Science and Technology Information Retrieval

Science.gov has served as a gateway to reliable information about science and technology from across Federal government organizations since its launch in December 2002. Now, the interagency alliance has launched Science.gov 2.0, hailing it the “next major step in government science information retrieval.”

To see its content, go to <http://www.science.gov>.

The updated web site offers additional content, technological enhancements, and a newly-developed relevancy ranking technology that helps users get to the best documents quickly. Science.gov lets users search across 30 databases from 12 government science agencies across 1,700 web sites – that’s 47 million pages.

Use of the site remains FREE with no registration required. The “FirstGov for Science,” as it is called, serves the educational and library communities, as well as, business people, entrepreneurs, agency scientists, and anyone with an interest in science. The advantage of Science.gov is that it lets users search for information by subject, rather than by the agency sponsoring it. Secretary of Energy, Spencer Abraham said: “From the most current information on new technologies, to historical research results, to the most promising medical advancements, Science.gov connects citizens to the world of science.”

Hosted by the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Science.gov is made possible through a collaboration of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, and Interior, as well as, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Government Printing Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation, with support from the National Archives and Records Administration.

This article is an edited version of an article by Paula J. Hane in Information Today <http://www.infotoday.com>.